Tuesday, 4 October 2016

SCOTTISH GOVERNMENT PERMITS TAIL SHORTENING FOR SPANIELS AND HPRS

Following changes to Animal Welfare legislation announced today by The Scottish Government, images like this should be consigned to the past.

RESPONSE TO SCOTTISH GOVERNMENT ANNOUNCEMENT ON TAIL SHORTENING FOR WORKING SPANIELS AND HUNT POINT RETRIEVERS.
Scottish Gamekeepers Association Chairman Alex Hogg said: “The benefit that this exemption to the law will convey in terms of the welfare of working Spaniels and Hunt Point Retrievers all over Scotland cannot be underestimated.
“It is a major improvement to Animal Welfare legislation in this country and one we welcome.
“By targeting the exemption specifically at the particular small sub-set of the dog population where evidence proves beyond doubt that there have been welfare issues which could no longer be ignored, Scottish Government deserve immense credit.
“Research from Glasgow University, commissioned by the Scottish Government, showed that over 1 in 2 working Spaniels with full tails suffered one or more painful tail injury in one season (56 per cent of all studied dogs).
“The same research also showed 1 in 3 Hunt Point Retrievers suffering the same fate (39 per cent of all studied dogs). That suffering could not continue indefinitely without address.
“This is an evidence-based decision which will ensure these animals can now carry out their duties with the protection they deserve. It allows those best qualified- the vets- to make a decision to remove the tail tip of a working Spaniel or Hunt Point Retriever, within the first few days of life, if they believe this will prevent greater damage and more serious injury in later life.
“The research recommended that removing one third of a working Spaniel or HPR’s tail as a pup would reduce the likelihood of more serious tail damage by 15 to 20 times.”
*The Scottish Gamekeepers Association presented a petition with over 4000 signatures to Scottish Government in 2015 arguing for an overturn of the ban on the shortening of working dogs' tails.