Thursday, 27 January 2022

Defra - Avian Influenza Latest Situation - 26 January 2022

 New Case England

  • Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 was confirmed in birds at premises near Whitby, Scarborough, North Yorkshire on 26 January 2022. A 3km Captive Bird (Monitoring) Controlled Zone has been put in place around the premises (zone in force from 19:00 on the 26 January 2022). All birds on the infected premises will be humanely culled.

 Case Updates England

  • Following successful completion of disease control activities and surveillance within the disease control zones surrounding a premises near Sudbury, Babergh, Suffolk, the 10km Surveillance Zone has been revoked (effective from 19:00 on the 26 January 2022). Local movement restrictions have now been removed but the Avian Influenza Prevention Zone (AIPZ) measures remain in force in this area.

Keepers can check where disease control zones are located in GB and if they are in zone on the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) interactive map, and in Northern Ireland on DAERA’s interactive map.

For further information on these cases and details of the measures that apply in the disease control zones currently in force see:

England: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/avian-influenza-bird-flu-cases-and-disease-control-zones-in-england This is particularly important given there are multiple overlapping zones.

Wales: https://gov.wales/avian-influenza-bird-flu-latest-update  

Scotland: https://www.gov.scot/publications/avian-influenza-bird-flu/

Northern Ireland: https://www.daera-ni.gov.uk/articles/avian-influenza-ai

To receive immediate notification of new cases and updated zones in GB please sign up to the APHA’s Animal Disease alert subscription service further details can be found at https://www.gov.uk/guidance/apha-alert-subscription-service

Outbreak Case Summary

In summary, since the first case confirmed in this outbreak on the 26 October 2021, 86 cases of avian influenza have been confirmed in the UK:

  • England: 72 cases of HPAI H5N1
  • Scotland: 6 cases of HPAI H5N1
  • Wales: 3 cases of HPAI H5N1
  • Northern Ireland: 5 cases of HPAI H5N1

This is now the largest ever UK outbreak of avian influenza (prior to this the largest number of cases was 26 cases in 2020/2021 and 13 cases in 2016/2017).

Bird keepers are reminded that an Avian Influenza Prevention Zone (AIPZ) including housing measures is in force across the UK. See gov.uk/bird-flu for further information.

High standards of biosecurity must be maintained as good practice for the health of your bird. Good biosecurity is an essential defence against diseases such as avian influenza and is key to limiting the spread of avian influenza in an outbreak.

Keepers must keep a close watch on their birds for any signs of disease, and seek prompt advice from a vet if they have any concerns. Clinical signs indicative of avian influenza must be reported in England to Defra Rural Services Helpline on 03000 200 301. In Wales, contact 0300 303 8268. In Scotland, contact to the local Field Services Office. Failure to do so is an offence.

Wednesday, 26 January 2022

Defra - Avian Influenza Latest Situation - 25 January 2022

 New Cases England

  • Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 was confirmed in birds at premises near Byker, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Tyne & Wear, England on the 25 January 2022. A 3km Protection Zone and 10km Surveillance Zone has been put in place around the premises (zones in force from 10:00 on the 25 January 2022). All poultry on the premises will be humanely culled.

Case Updates England

  • Following successful completion of disease control activities and surveillance within the disease control zones around a premises near Tutbury, East Staffordshire, Staffordshire, England, the 3km Protection Zone declared on the 2 December 2021 has ended, and the area has merged with the 10km Surveillance Zone. A 10km Surveillance Zone remains in force in this area (effective from 15:00 on the 25 January 2022)
  • Following successful completion of disease control activities and surveillance within the disease control zones surrounding a premises near Clifford, Hereford and South Herefordshire, Herefordshire, England, the 3km Protection Zone has ended and the 10km Surveillance Zone has been revoked. For the areas that crossed the border into Wales, the 3km Protection Zone, 10km Surveillance Zone and 10km Restricted Zone have also been removed. Local movement restrictions have now been removed (effective from 17:00 on the 25 January 2022) however the Avian Influenza Prevention Zone (AIPZ) measures remain in force for this area.

Keepers can check where disease control zones are located in GB and if they are in zone on the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) interactive map, and in Northern Ireland on DAERA’s interactive map.

For further information on these cases and details of the measures that apply in the disease control zones currently in force see:

England: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/avian-influenza-bird-flu-cases-and-disease-control-zones-in-england This is particularly important given there are multiple overlapping zones.

Wales: https://gov.wales/avian-influenza-bird-flu-latest-update  

Scotland: https://www.gov.scot/publications/avian-influenza-bird-flu/

Northern Ireland: https://www.daera-ni.gov.uk/articles/avian-influenza-ai

To receive immediate notification of new cases and updated zones in GB please sign up to the APHA’s Animal Disease alert subscription service further details can be found at https://www.gov.uk/guidance/apha-alert-subscription-service

Outbreak Case Summary

In summary, since the first case confirmed in this outbreak on the 26 October 2021, 85 cases of avian influenza have been confirmed in the UK:

  • England: 71 cases of HPAI H5N1
  • Scotland: 6 cases of HPAI H5N1
  • Wales: 3 cases of HPAI H5N1
  • Northern Ireland: 5 cases of HPAI H5N1

This is now the largest ever UK outbreak of avian influenza (prior to this the largest number of cases was 26 cases in 2020/2021 and 13 cases in 2016/2017).

Bird keepers are reminded that an Avian Influenza Prevention Zone (AIPZ) including housing measures is in force across the UK. See gov.uk/bird-flu for further information.

High standards of biosecurity must be maintained as good practice for the health of your bird. Good biosecurity is an essential defence against diseases such as avian influenza and is key to limiting the spread of avian influenza in an outbreak.

Keepers must keep a close watch on their birds for any signs of disease, and seek prompt advice from a vet if they have any concerns. Clinical signs indicative of avian influenza must be reported in England to Defra Rural Services Helpline on 03000 200 301. In Wales, contact 0300 303 8268. In Scotland, contact to the local Field Services Office. Failure to do so is an offence.

Friday, 21 January 2022

Defra - Avian Influenza Latest Situation - 20 January 2022

 New Case in England

  • Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 was confirmed in birds at a premises near Ross-on-Wye, Hereford and South Herefordshire, Herefordshire on the 20 January 2022. A 3km Protection Zone and 10km Surveillance Zone has been put in place around the premises (zones in force from 20:00 20 January 2022). All birds on the infected premises will be humanely culled.

 Case Updates

·         Following successful completion of disease control activities and surveillance within the disease control zones surrounding the premises the 3km Protection Zone has ended, and the relevant areas have been merged with the 10km Surveillance Zone. A 10km Surveillance Zone remains in force surrounding these premises.

 Following successful completion of disease control activities and surveillance within the zones surrounding the premises remaining disease control zones surrounding the following premises have been revoked.  Local movement restrictions have now been removed but the Avian Influenza Prevention Zone (AIPZ) measures remain in place.

      • near Gretna, Dumfriesshire, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland (revoked 17 January 2022)
      • near Annan, Dumfriesshire, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland (revoked 16 January 2022)
      • near Leominster, North Herefordshire, Herefordshire (revoked 14 January 2022)
      • near Moffat, Dumfriesshire, Dumfries and Galloway, Scotland (revoked 14 January 2022)

Keepers can check where disease control zones are located in GB and if they are in zone on the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) interactive map, and in Northern Ireland on DAERA’s interactive map.

For further information on these cases and details of the measures that apply in the disease control zones currently in force see:

England: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/avian-influenza-bird-flu-cases-and-disease-control-zones-in-england This is particularly important given there are multiple overlapping zones.

Wales: https://gov.wales/avian-influenza-bird-flu-latest-update

Scotland: https://www.gov.scot/publications/avian-influenza-bird-flu/

Northern Ireland: https://www.daera-ni.gov.uk/articles/avian-influenza-ai

To receive immediate notification of new cases and updated zones in GB please sign up to the APHA’s Animal Disease alert subscription service further details can be found at https://www.gov.uk/guidance/apha-alert-subscription-service

Outbreak Case Summary

In summary, since the first case confirmed in this outbreak on the 26 October 2021, 82 cases of avian influenza have been confirmed in the UK:

  • England: 69 cases of HPAI H5N1
  • Scotland: 5 cases of HPAI H5N1
  • Wales: 3 cases of HPAI H5N1
  • Northern Ireland: 5 cases of HPAI H5N1

This is now the largest ever UK outbreak of avian influenza (prior to this the largest number of cases was 26 cases in 2020/2021 and 13 cases in 2016/2017).

Bird keepers are reminded that an Avian Influenza Prevention Zone (AIPZ) including housing measures is in force across the UK. See gov.uk/bird-flu for further information.

High standards of biosecurity must be maintained as good practice for the health of your bird. Good biosecurity is an essential defence against diseases such as avian influenza and is key to limiting the spread of avian influenza in an outbreak.

Keepers must keep a close watch on their birds for any signs of disease, and seek prompt advice from a vet if they have any concerns. Clinical signs indicative of avian influenza must be reported in England to Defra Rural Services Helpline on 03000 200 301. In Wales, contact 0300 303 8268. In Scotland, contact to the local Field Services Office. Failure to do so is an offence.

Avian influenza outbreak - specific advice to all involved with gamebirds in Scotland

As you will be aware, due to an increased risk of incursion of avian influenza (bird flu) for wild birds, gamebirds, poultry and other captive birds within the UK, an Avian Influenza Prevention Zone (AIPZ) was declared by Scottish Ministers, covering the whole of Scotland, on 03 November 2021. Similar legislation was enacted across all UK administrations.

Subsequently, measures that made it a legal requirement for all poultry and captive birds (with the exception of game birds kept for restocking)  to be housed or otherwise kept separate from wild birds, and for all bird keepers to follow strict biosecurity measures in order to contain and eradicate the disease, were implemented on 29 November 2021.

Following feedback from stakeholders and government colleagues, and in light of recent outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza within the UK, we recognised a need to issue the following important outbreak-specific advice to all involved with gamebirds in Scotland.

Biosecurity

Biosecurity means simple procedures or steps you can take to prevent disease. The risk of bird flu in the UK from wild birds never disappears completely and so good biosecurity should be incorporated into daily practice, but during an outbreak period it is vital to protect your birds.  An outbreak of bird flu at any size game or poultry establishment can have a profound impact on the commercial game and poultry sector through both the introduction of movement restrictions and temporary loss of exports with other countries.

This biosecurity guidance includes details of measures that should be taken in the current Avian Influenza Prevention Zone and provides specific advice for game bird keepers. Complete the biosecurity self-assessment checklist to ensure you are complying with the mandatory biosecurity requirements.

Legal Requirement

The legal requirement to house all poultry or captive birds in the UK includes caught-up gamebirds. The aim of this requirement is to segregate poultry and captive birds, such as caught up gamebirds, from wild birds as much as is possible to reduce the risk of infection. The exception to this requirement are game birds kept for restocking supplies. Although it is important to note that these birds must be supplied with feed and water either indoors or under a shelter which prevents contact by wild birds with the feed and water supplied.

Bird Gatherings

A further biosecurity measure integral to the legal restrictions applied, and key to reducing the risk of onward spread, is the amendment of the General Licence permitting bird gatherings (to prohibit gatherings involving kept galliformes (chickens, turkeys, pheasants, partridges, quails and other land fowl) and kept anseriformes, (ducks, geese, swans and other water fowl). It is important to stress that these bird gathering events include the catching-up of wild game birds. There are, however, exceptions to this and the following are not considered to be gatherings and do not, therefore, need to be licensed:

·         catching-up of wild game birds (where they have come from multiple locations but are then moved to a single location afterwards, and remain there for breeding or other purposes)

 

·         birds which are brought together from different locations, but where no birds move off the premises within 13 days of the last bird arriving on the premises;

It should be noted, however, that there is some risk that birds gathered from the wild could be infected with avian influenza, and by gathering them up and bringing them back to a farm/shoot/estate, this could infect the birds that are already there.  Caught up pheasants are defined as poultry.  Therefore, if disease is confirmed, this would result in a new infected premises. It is on this basis that all catching up activities are not recommended whilst the AIPZ measures are still in effect.

This recommendation holds even greater weight for premises that fall within geographical areas deemed at particular high risk to avian influenza (HRAs). Check if your premises falls within one of these areas by using our interactive map (please note the ‘layers’ functionality button top right on this interactive screen to add HRAs to the map).

Register Your Birds

There is a legal requirement for all poultry keepers with 50 or more birds to register their premises on the Great Britain Poultry Register – this includes game keepers. The voluntary registration of premises with fewer than 50 birds is highly encouraged - particularly if you are in, or close to, a higher risk area.

General Advice

It should be noted that this is general advice for those whose activities do not fall within Protection and Surveillance Zones associated with an outbreak premises, within which specific legal regulations apply.

It is also worth noting that catching up gamebirds is only legal until 28th February in Scotland.

Avian influenza is a notifiable disease by law. If you find a single dead wild waterfowl (swans, geese or ducks), a single dead bird of prey, or five or more dead wild birds of any other species (including gulls) at the same place at the same time, you should report them to Defra’s GB-wide telephone helpline: 03459 33 55 77 (please select option 7). It is advisable that you do not touch these birds.

Know the signs of bird flu in kept birds, which include loss of appetite, swollen heads, respiratory problems and multiple unexpected deaths. If you suspect any type of avian influenza in poultry or captive birds you must report it immediately by contacting your local APHA office. Failure to do so is an offence.

Bird flu and its consequences can certainly impact game management and shooting, but it is also true that game managers and shooters are in a good position to detect and report outbreaks. Please be vigilant and report any concerns.

Scottish Government have joined with organisations involved in gamebird management to issue revised guidance on bird flu and the way it can affect the activities of gamebird rearers.

Queries specific to gamebirds and avian influenza can also be addressed to:

The Game Farmers Association

PO Box 3629

Wokingham

RG40 9LG

Tel: 01189 797255

Email: dominic@gfa.org.uk

Scottish Government guidance on avian influenza can be found at:

www.gov.scot/avianinfluenza

You may wish to pass this information on to your members as appropriate.

Wednesday, 19 January 2022

SCOTTISH GAMEKEEPERS' CHAIRMAN RECEIVES MBE IN EDINBURGH CEREMONY

Alex with his medal for Services to Gamekeeping in Scotland.

Scottish Gamekeepers Association Chairman Alex Hogg received his MBE for Services to Gamekeeping in Scotland this afternoon (Jan 19) at a ceremony in Edinburgh.

It was a memorable day for the Chairman, his family and the entire gamekeeping community as Alex belatedly received his honour from the Princess Royal, dressed in his estate tweed (including kilt).

Due to Covid-19 in-person award ceremonies have been restricted.

However, the Borders gamekeeper picked up his medal in a Covid-compliant service, watched on by wife, Caroline.

He was notified of his award of Member of the Order of the British Empire in the Queen’s Birthday Honours List in Autumn 2020.

“I am overjoyed for the gamekeepers,” he said. “This honour has been very rarely awarded for this reason and I’d like to thank the whole gamekeeping family because it is a team, not me.

“This is for everyone who has been there for The Scottish Gamekeepers Association all these years, since the outset.”

Receiving the award in 2022 is fitting as the SGA celebrates a quarter century of representing gamekeepers, deer managers and ghillies of land and river. 

The organisation hosts its 25th Anniversary AGM at McDiarmid Park in Perth on Friday 4th March.







 

Tuesday, 18 January 2022

Avian influenza – Lifting of Disease Control Zones around Infected Premises near Moffat, Annan and Gretna

Following the completion of preliminary cleansing and disinfection, and all mandatory surveillance requirements and investigations, Scottish Ministers have declared the lifting of the 10 km Surveillance Zones, which had been applied around highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 infected premises in three locations: near Moffat, near Annan and near Gretna, all in Dumfries and Galloway.

These zones were revoked on the following dates and times:

  • Outbreak near Moffat  10:45 am  14 January 2022
  • Outbreak near Annan 12 noon    16 January 2022
  • Outbreak near Gretna 11:00 am  18 January 2022

HPAI H5N1 had been confirmed at these locations by Scotland’s Chief Veterinary Officer (CVO), Sheila Voas, on 10 December, 09 December and 15 December respectively, and a 3 km Protection Zone and 10 km Surveillance Zone had been applied in each case.

With the Protection Zones being lifted by Ministers in these locations on 05 January,  07 December and 10 December respectively, the removal of the Surveillance Zones means that there are currently no specific restrictions remaining in these areas, with the exception of those affecting each infected premises.

Two of these Surveillance Zones, those associated with the outbreak in Annan and Gretna, included areas within England, so Defra have simultaneously lifted the associated Surveillance Zones implemented south of the border.

However, the UK-wide Avian Influenza Protection Zone (AIPZ) remains in place, and producers and bird keepers are reminded that they are legally required to comply with the Order to house birds that came in to effect, as part of the AIPZ on 29 November 2021, and to follow strict biosecurity procedures, regardless of the number of birds being kept.  Keepers who are concerned about the health or welfare of their flock should seek veterinary advice immediately.

Clinical signs indicative of avian influenza must be reported to your local Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) Field OfficeFailure to do so is an offence.

High standards of biosecurity must be maintained, as good practice for the health of your birds, and good biosecurity, is an essential defence against diseases, such as avian influenza, and is key to limiting the spread of avian influenza in an outbreak.

The advice from Public Health Scotland is that the risk to human health from the virus remains very low, and food standards bodies advise that avian influenzas pose a very low food safety risk for UK consumers.  It does not affect the consumption of poultry products, including eggs.

Outbreak Overview

The cases of HPAI H5N1 in poultry and captive birds across the UK for this outbreak season now total 81:

·         68 are in England

·         5 are in Scotland

·         5 are in Northern Ireland

·         3 are in Wales

This is the largest ever UK outbreak of avian influenza (prior to this, the largest number was 26 cases of HPAI in the UK in 2020/2021 and 13 cases in 2016/2017).

Compliance with the AIPZ Housing Measures

As previously stated, within the AIPZ it is a legal requirement to house your birds or otherwise keep them separate from wild birds.  Avian influenza controls, including the AIPZ, are enforced by Trading Standards or the Environmental Health Service of a Local Authority.

See the postcode tool available on gov.scot to find details of how to contact your Local Authority with any reports of non-compliance.

GB Poultry Register

In GB, you are legally required to register your birds if you keep more than 50. However, keepers with less than 50 birds are strongly encouraged to register in order to receive valuable updates and advice.  It is also a legal requirement to notify APHA of any significant changes in the average number of birds kept.

Further advice for keepers can be found on our avian influenza webpages.

Monday, 17 January 2022

Moorland Forum Public Online Debate - 9 February 2022

Moorland Forum are inviting the public to take part in their online debate on Rewilding.

Please find below a link to the Eventbrite registration process of the Forum’s public online debate on Rewilding to be held on 9 February 2022 between 7-8pm.  Please could you circulate this widely via your usual media channels.

 https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/rewilding-and-scotlands-moorlands-a-discussion-tickets-244427137147



Friday, 14 January 2022

Defra - Avian Influenza Latest Situation - 13 January 2022

 New Cases in England

Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 was confirmed on 13 January 2022 in commercial poultry at the following premises. A 3km Protection Zone and 10km Surveillance Zone has been put in place around each of the premises. All birds on the infected premises will be humanely culled.

Keepers can check where disease control zones are located in GB and if they are in zone on the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) interactive map, and in Northern Ireland on DAERA’s interactive map.

For further information on these cases and details of the measures that apply in the disease control zones currently in force see:

England: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/avian-influenza-bird-flu-cases-and-disease-control-zones-in-england This is particularly important given there are multiple overlapping zones.

Wales: https://gov.wales/avian-influenza-bird-flu-latest-update

Scotland: https://www.gov.scot/publications/avian-influenza-bird-flu/

Northern Ireland: https://www.daera-ni.gov.uk/articles/avian-influenza-ai

To receive immediate notification of new cases and updated zones in GB please sign up to the APHA’s Animal Disease alert subscription service further details can be found at https://www.gov.uk/guidance/apha-alert-subscription-service

Outbreak Case Summary

In summary, since the first case confirmed in this outbreak on the 26 October 2021, 81 cases of avian influenza have been confirmed in the UK:

  • England: 68 cases of HPAI H5N1
  • Scotland: 5 cases of HPAI H5N1
  • Wales: 3 cases of HPAI H5N1
  • Northern Ireland: 5 cases of HPAI H5N1

This is now the largest ever UK outbreak of avian influenza (prior to this the largest number of cases was 26 cases in 2020/2021 and 13 cases in 2016/2017).

Bird keepers are reminded that an Avian Influenza Prevention Zone (AIPZ) including housing measures is in force across the UK. See GOV.UK for further information.

High standards of biosecurity must be maintained as good practice for the health of your birds, and that good biosecurity is an essential defence against diseases such as avian influenza and is key to limiting the spread of avian influenza in an outbreak.

Keepers must keep a close watch on their birds for any signs of disease, and seek prompt advice from a vet if they have any concerns. Clinical signs indicative of avian influenza must be reported in England to Defra Rural Services Helpline on 03000 200 301. In Wales, contact 0300 303 8268. In Scotland, contact to the local Field Services Office. Failure to do so is an offence.

Tuesday, 11 January 2022

Avian influenza – Lifting of Protection Zone around Infected Premises near Gretna, Dumfries and Galloway

Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 was previously confirmed at two premises near Gretna by Scotland’s Chief Veterinary Officer (CVO), Sheila Voas, on 03 December 2021 and 15 December 2021.  A 3 km Protection Zone and 10 km Surveillance Zone were applied around the first infected premises (IP) on 04 December 2021.  The second IP was deemed a “special category premises” due to its non-commercial nature.  The premises fell within the existing 3 km PZ and 10 km SZ of the previous Gretna IP.  As a result of this, and based on a veterinary risk assessment, no new disease control zones were applied.

The confirmation of the second Gretna IP within existing disease control zones extended the minimum time period required for these zones to be in place.

Following the completion of preliminary cleansing and disinfection, and mandatory surveillance requirements, Scottish Ministers have declared the lifting of the 3 km Protection Zone detailed above.  The area this comprised has now merged with the 10 km Surveillance Zone, which is still in force.

 The GB-wide Avian Influenza Protection Zone (AIPZ), remains in place, and producers and bird keepers are reminded that they are legally required to comply with the Order to house birds that came in to effect, as part of the AIPZ, on 24 November 2021, and to follow biosecurity procedures, regardless of the number of birds being kept.  Keepers who are concerned about the health or welfare of their flock should seek veterinary advice immediately.

Further advice for keepers can be found here: avian influenza.

Defra - Avian Influenza Latest Situation - 10 January 2022

New Case England

  • Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 was suspected on 9 January 2022 in commercial poultry at a second premises near Louth, East Lindsey, Lincolnshire. Following testing, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 was confirmed at this premises. A 3km Protection Zone and 10km Surveillance Zone has been put in place around the premises, these zones revoke and replace the Temporary Control Zones put in place surrounding this premises. All poultry on the premises will be humanely culled.

Case Update Wales

  • Following successful completion of disease control activities and surveillance within the zones surrounding the premises near Crickhowell, Powys, Wales on the 10 January 2022 the 10km Surveillance Zone and 10km Restricted Zone surrounding this premises have been revoked. Local movement restrictions have now been removed but the Avian Influenza Prevention Zone (AIPZ) measures remain in place.

Keepers can check where disease control zones are located in GB and if they are in zone on the Animal and Plant Health Agency (APHA) interactive map, and in Northern Ireland on DAERA’s interactive map.

For further information on these cases and details of the measures that apply in the disease control zones currently in force see:

England: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/avian-influenza-bird-flu-cases-and-disease-control-zones-in-england This is particularly important given there are multiple overlapping zones.

Wales: https://gov.wales/avian-influenza-bird-flu-latest-update

Scotland: https://www.gov.scot/publications/avian-influenza-bird-flu/

Northern Ireland: https://www.daera-ni.gov.uk/articles/avian-influenza-ai

 

To receive immediate notification of new cases and updated zones in GB please sign up to the APHA’s Animal Disease alert subscription service further details can be found at https://www.gov.uk/guidance/apha-alert-subscription-service

Outbreak Case Summary

In summary, since the first case confirmed in this outbreak on the 26 October 2021, 79 cases of avian influenza have been confirmed in the UK:

  • England: 66 cases of HPAI H5N1
  • Scotland: 5 cases of HPAI H5N1
  • Wales: 3 cases of HPAI H5N1
  • Northern Ireland: 5 cases of HPAI H5N1

This is now the largest ever UK outbreak of avian influenza (prior to this the largest number of cases was 26 cases in 2020/2021 and 13 cases in 2016/2017).

Bird keepers are reminded that an Avian Influenza Prevention Zone (AIPZ) including housing measures is in force across the UK. See GOV.UK for further information.

High standards of biosecurity must be maintained as good practice for the health of your birds, and that good biosecurity is an essential defence against diseases such as avian influenza and is key to limiting the spread of avian influenza in an outbreak.

Find out what you can do to keep your birds free of avian influenza by registering for Defra’s ‘stop the spread’ webinars.

 Keepers must keep a close watch on their birds for any signs of disease, and seek prompt advice from a vet if they have any concerns. Clinical signs indicative of avian influenza must be reported in England to Defra Rural Services Helpline on 03000 200 301. In Wales, contact 0300 303 8268. In Scotland, contact to the local Field Services Office. Failure to do so is an offence.